A World Without Money

Imagine a resource based economy, where we revere nature and make our planet a shared possession rather than one dominated by crooked politicians and greedy capitalists.

Colin Turner of the Free World Charter advocates such a world, as did Jacque Fresco of the Venus Project.

Imagine a utopia where there are no starving millions living on less that a dollar a day, no poverty, no curable disease left uncured. Where the miracle of technology is used to heal and nurture the planet and its ecology, rather than destroy it.

Where people live to co-operate and care for each other, rather than compete and destroy. Where capitalism is replaced by sharing and kindness. Where love of the world and everything in it becomes our dominant motive. Where the ego is relinquished in favor of reality and we stop working for our own destructive self interest.

Does a dream of such beauty always have to turn into dystopian nightmare and should we let that fear stop us from pursuing a better society?

Does the attempt to turn our lives into something dreamt of by Jesus of Nazareth and countless other visionaries have to be abandoned, just because in the past it has lead to the tyranny of the monolithic medieval Catholic Church or the horrors of the Gulag?

Should we give up our longing for a better world just because we have failed to achieve it in the past? Or should we aim to reform ourselves and try and try again until we achieve the heaven on earth we all at heart long for?

Gerard Manly Hopkins expressed the eternal human desire for a better place as follows:

I have desired to go
Where springs not fail,
To fields where flies no sharp and sided hail,
And a few lilies blow.

And I have asked to be
Where no storms come,
Where the green swell is in the havens dumb,
And out of the swing of the sea.

If we stop dreaming beautiful dreams we waste the gift of consciousness.

10 Comments

  1. For years, the small Asian nation of Bhutan has defined success not through its economy, but through happiness. The Buddhist nation pioneered the idea of “Gross National Happiness” to measure the country’s well-being, and supposedly, its prime minister once touted Bhutan as the “happiest nation in the world.”

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    1. I have long yearned to visit that country for that very reason. I believe also that successful and happy communes have much to teach us. There is one close to ne here called the Bruderhof. Although I am not a Christian I admire their way of life greatly. They seem kind, honest and decent people. Theirs is a model worth exploring. Robert Owen the philanthropist is one of my heroes – the 19th Century Mill owner. Will it ever happen? I hope so.

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    1. Interesting – I know of them but have never looked very deeply. I am such a lone wolf that however much I admire and love the sound of so many orders like the Quakers and the Bruderhof, however much I believe in equality and sharing, I would find it difficult to live in a commune or monastery. I am a hermit. But I am very pleased to hear that the Quakers do such good in the world. I have never been pro-active in such matters however much I passionately believe in the ideas I write about.

      I think that the pen is, realistically, my only means of doing good things. Even to write about such ideals must do some good. Even if I could never be an activist or join one of these groups I may hope to spread the word through sharing my thoughts. Better than doing nothing!

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  2. Watching part 3 of Zeitgeist trilogy (Zeitgeist: Moving Forward) put me on to Mr Fresco and his utopian vision of a hi-tech resource based economy, truly inspiring stuff in an uninspiring paradigm that we currently all live in.

    I guess if the trans-human existence ever becomes a reality then something like the Venus Project is the only way forward (post some sort of cataclysmic shift or event, which sadly may be the only way it will ever occur). Like Covid-19, Humanity 1.0 has all the hallmarks of a virus (a harmful or corrupting agency), which can be cured by a vaccine of peace, love and understanding (to quote the real Elvis).

    Love the photo at the top by the way, I often stand on Crosby Beach next to one of the Gormley statues and reflect that there is very little on the horizon, but every now and again a ship (of hope?) appears into view…

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    1. Wonderful reply and thank you. I so hope for a better future. The photo is of my son in front of the Turner Gallery in Margate. I love Gormley statues too. We had walked from Broadstairs to Margate along the beach at low tide.

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  3. I long for this sort of world. The one where compassion outweighs self interest and kindness is praised over brute strength and crudeness. We’ve spoken of how ugly that world has become a time or two. So while it saddens me to know the view across the pond isn’t much brighter I am happy to see a kindred spirit dreaming the big dreams. You spoke of time with your nieces in another post and they reminded me of my daughter. The kids coming up give me so much hope as they are seemingly disconnected from all the go getter venom my parents generation instilled in us. The twinkle in their eyes reminds me the world isn’t totally lost. Then, I read this and found that same spark darting about the mind of- forgive me- an elder of society. Somewhere in the mix of everything is a thirst for unity and lasting peace that won’t be contained as ideas aren’t so easily conquered. We will rise above. Thank you for reminding me of that.

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    1. An elder I am! I have found true passion and purpose recently in a way that I have never achieved before. I have often considered my life a useless failure, despite having made achievements others might consider not so small. I have often wanted to make a difference in life, to heal, to smooth, to comfort, to make better. I have come to the conclusion that my only real skill these days is to write. And to write of my passions, my hopes for the world and of the things that give me great joy. I may not have the wealth to be a philanthropist or the energy or inclination or ability to heal the sick or cure poverty. But I am hoping that perhaps my writing could have some small influence for good. Thank you so much for your insightful views. They are much appreciated.

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